Friday, October 23, 2009

Texas Native Plant Week: Ageratina species

On this last day of Texas Native Plant Week, I started a list of Texas Natives also found here at my place. I stopped at 30, including a number of trees, not breaking down Quercus into the many oaks, not the Hollies.

The first wildflower on the list I read at a Texas site was Ageratina havanensis. I found an Ageratina species, possibly Ageratina aromatica, on one of my plant searches the other day, blooming on the west side of a fence that backs up to a pine thicket.




The name has changed from Eupatorium to Ageratina. It is related to Joe Pye weed and boneset, recognized by the lack of petals around the ray flowers. Ageratina altissima causes poisoning of cattle. When passed to people in milk, it causes 'milk sickness,' reported to have caused the death of Abraham Lincoln's mother when he was only nine years old. This loss along with some other deaths of family members was believed to have contributed to Lincoln's tendency to melancholy.

15 comments:

  1. You have such a wealth of trivia information (as I've noticed in the weekend games, too)! It is a pretty plant, but the poison background makes it a bit evil (which means that deer won't eat it).

    Cameron

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Cameron.

    This Ageratina looks a lot like the 'wild ageratum' that grows wild in the next county but not here, except that Eupatorium coelestinum has blue flowers. The Texans call it 'Greggs Mist.' I wonder if it is deer resistant as well. I grew the blue when I lived farther north but it didn't take when I scattered seeds from the next county, here.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello Nell,

    What an pretty flower with such an interesting history. Thank you for sharing the beautiful native Texas plants. We can grow many of them here in Arizona.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What an interesting background on this Texas native. I'm slowly adding more natives to my own garden. Don't have near as many as you do yet. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. WHAT is this Texas Natives thing? I have Texas Natives! Lots and lots of them. Do you know Coral Bean? How about our Fairy Duster? Tell me, please! And this is the last day, you say? Shoot!

    ReplyDelete
  6. And I love that plant! It is beautiful. I don't know that I have ever seen it. I have a lot of the Gregg's Mist. It is the #1 magnet for Monarch butterflies. They will swarm this plant!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pretty pretty plant and a lovely butterfly adorning it....
    I love the information you included...very interesting...

    I grow many toxic plants....I have a huge rabbit problem, so I know the majority of them will not be eaten.
    I am teaching the grandchildren about the toxicity of plants.....

    ReplyDelete
  8. Nell, that is a native plant here. I know it as eupatorium rugosum, or white snakeroot.

    I made the mistake of moving a plant to the yard...........it self seeds rampantly. I have to dig out several each year or they would take over the beds. It is pretty though, blooming quite late here.

    I love the piece on the rocks also.

    ReplyDelete
  9. There's a clump of the blue agertina growing in a ditch not far from me. It's such a bright blue and always loaded with bees and butterflies. I plan to keep an eye on it to see if I can scrounge some seeds.

    Cameron is right, you have so much information at hand. I almost always learn something from my visits here.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Very informative post. I love reading about native plants in a part of the country that is so different from where I live. -Jackie

    ReplyDelete
  11. I have an old herbal book that my MIL gave me, it has a lot of herbal remedies that would do us all in.
    Good informative post!
    Rosey

    ReplyDelete
  12. I wonder if this plant is listed in that new plant book about poison plants that angry people used to poison their enemies to death. I can't recall the name of it. It looks a lot like Chocolate Euaptorium to me. E. rugosum. A nice specimen if planted away from the herbivores.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great flower, love the butterfly and such interesting history stories. A reminder that plants and humans affect each other.

    ReplyDelete
  14. what a pretty new header photo. interesting post, too. love to visit your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love this family of plants. Though, of course, I promise not to eat them. I've heard my newly aquired E. coelestinum will spead fast--is this true? It sure perked up the September garden.

    ReplyDelete

I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



Google+ Followers