Tuesday, October 13, 2009

A Walk in the Meadow

Touring the Meadows for Signs of Fall.

Every tree and plant in the meadow seemed to be dancing, those which average eyes would see as fixed and still. — Mevlana Rumi (1207-1273)


Fallen tree with Poke Weed. Many creatures find shelter and food here.


Path mowed through the meadow under old Pecan trees.


Sassafras leaves hanging like red mittens predict winter's chill to come.


This Live Oak fell during a Hurricane in 1985. The roots are mostly above ground, but the tree lives on, a haven for many small creatures.

A broader view of the ancient Live Oak.


Burrow of a Gopher Turtle, with Purple Love Grass and Silk Grass growing close by. Silk Grass is the one with yellow blooms.


Live Oak trees in the background give little hint that winter is coming, but the dry grass in the foreground gives it away. Rabbit Tobacco and Goldenrod show that fall is here.

25 comments:

  1. Hi Nell Jean, what a wonderful meadow, thanks for showing us. The live oak still live after being blown over is incredible! Talk about the will to live. Those grasses are gorgeous, I will have to check into the silk grass, wonder if it is hardy here in zone 7? I wish everyone would let their lawns turn to meadow and just mow paths through them. Think what a nicer place it would be in suburban neighborhoods. :-)
    Frances

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  2. Good morning, Nell Jean. Boy, would I like to walk that mowed path under the old Pecan trees. And I luv the word Sassafras and your comparison of the leaves to red mittens.

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  3. Nell Jean, thanks for the walkabout.
    Scott

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  4. Oh if I had a meadow that large...I'd be dangerous.

    The rabbit tobacco. I've got some grayish plants in my "lawn" that pop up with seed heads like that when I let them grow and skip mowing for a while. I'll have to see if they're the same plant. I just assumed it was another weed.

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  5. thank you for visiting my blog. yours is wonderful! i agree with frances about the meadow... beautiful!

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  6. What a beautiful meadow! And I love the way you've included the fallen trees which are still a source for food and shelter for the wildlife there. Wouldn't I love to walk about in a place like that?:)

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  7. Oh, what an enjoyable place to visit! We have a raging storm here today. Makes me glad to remember that even those trees that fall can be home to life.

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  8. How beautiful. It makes me wish that I had a meadow nearby to take a walk in. Thank you for sharing yours..

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  9. Hello! That was a great quote! I love meadows and this one is particularly lovely. I've recently added silk grass to the garden. The yellow aster like flower is perfect on its grass like stems. I totally recommend it! Must find out more about the Purple love grass!
    gail

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  10. What a lovely meadow you have. I am always amazed by the live oaks in the south. They are such tenacious trees growing in the most inhospitable areas. You are so lucky to have a gopher turtle on your property. That would be a sight to see one lumbering across the meadow.

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  11. The live oak is just wonderful with moss growing on his trunk, making a home for all the other creatures. I also enjoy the grasses. A walk in a meadow cures the ailing soul.

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  12. Beautiful setting! It must be a great place to walk and enjoy on pretty days.

    Cameron

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  13. Thanks for taking us on a walk in your meadow. I enjoyed it so much, but my pedometer didn't register any steps. I think it's so cool that you have habitats for critters.

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  14. Nell Jean, I love the rural pictures. The meadow is just lovely.

    Aren't trees amazing. I will have to check the giant elm in the garden to see if it has totally died. I need to be more observant!

    I am loving the way the meadow flowers are coming along.Do you have larkspur? I think they would be a great accent in with the poppies.

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  15. Aha what a wonderful meadow. I could only see them when visiting country side. You must have had great fun and excitement walking through.

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  16. Nell Jean, hello, and thank you for stopping by and introducing yourself. Love the shots of the meadow and grasses... you allowed me to linger. Look forward to seeing more.

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  17. Hi Nell Jean-
    thanks for visiting my blog, I love your comparison of sasafras leaves to mittens, perfect! You are indeed lucky to have such a meadow, it's good for those of us fortunate enogh to live in the countryside to share the view with others, nice job.
    Maria

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  18. Nell Jean, I linked to this post on my Silk Grass post...thank you for reminding me you had mentioned it.

    gail

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  19. Frances, I see on Gail's blog that you all have discussed Silk Grass. It is a wildflower here, with no help from me. I am including it on my Bloom Day post tomorrow.

    Donna, my grandson used to call it Frosh Frosh. The children would sniff the broken twigs, which smell like root beer.

    Tom, rabbit tobacco has a distintive fragrance. I can tell it from cudweed by just pinching a leaf.

    I wish that all of you could take a real walk here. The weather will soon be perfect for walking as it gets cooler.

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  20. I enjoyed looking at your blog. Pretty photos and it is nice to see wide open spaces!

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  21. Nell Jean, I loved the walk through your meadow. I could actually smell, hear, and feel each part of it. Pamela x

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  22. There is nothing like a lively meadow and the old oak is amazing. Can't believe it's still living. Never seen one do that.

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  23. Hi Nell Jean, I wanted to answer your question on Christopher's blog about wordpress costing money. Just to be hosted on there is free, but to upgrade to be able to change the code on the stylesheet to make the pictures bigger, or any size you want or change the font, etc. costs $15 a year. I look forward to seeing your Silk Grass. :-)
    Frances

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  24. Let me join in the chorus of praise for this post. Beautiful photos.

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  25. I am not sure that Live Oak is any less lovely lying on the ground as it was standing. You are fortunate to have such a meadow.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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