Monday, December 28, 2009

"No Crinum Ever Died"

"No Crinum ever died," or so says Billy Welch at TAMU. A few have sulked along the way and refused to bloom when not treated well.

Red Dirt Ramblings wrote about crinums recently. I think Meems at Hoe and Shovel still has crinums blooming.

Following are some crinum pics from my summer garden from the past three years. All are either crinums that were here before me, or pass-a-longs from other garden friends. The two that I was sure of the name at one time, I have confused with one another and moved one of them.
Crinum


crinum
These Milk and Wine lilies have been here for seventy years.

crinum

crinum
This crinum Jagus opens at night and has the sweet fragrance of vanilla throughout the next day.

crinum
Blooms last for a day; they bloom in sequence.

crinum
Crinums play well with other tropical bulbs like cannas and crocosmia.

The foliage of some crinums here has already disappeared. A few have foliage persisting, with leaf ends bitten by  frosts. A hard freeze will blacken them. They are slow to emerge in spring.

This 'string lily' crinum plays well with colocasia.



If you're interested in real names of crinums, you can look for Marcelle's Crinums on the net, or Dr. Joe Shaw (Conroe Joe) who are two crinum experts -- Marcelle hybridizes, Dr. Joe identifies.

Elizabeth Lawrence wrote about Crinums. She addressed both Crinums and other Amarylliads which can be read on the TAMU site.

A search for 'Crinums TAMU' turns up crinums and other members of amarylliadaceae, more than can be imagined. There are 63 amarylliadaceae genera listed.

26 comments:

  1. Wow..those are real pretty! Lovely!!

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  2. Nice collection of Crinums. That night bloomer is such a tease...as are most night bloomers. One needs to make a special trip out to the garden at night to enjoy the blooms.

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  3. Nell, the first pink crinum looks like 'Mrs. James Hendry', Dr. Welch's favorite.

    My crinums are black from frost now. They will return in Spring, but I am going to do some serious planning and moving of plants this year. Should I move them before the foliage emerges in Spring?

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  4. I've never tried them here...but they sure are pretty blooming plants. EAL is one of my favorite garden writers~~It might be a good time to reread her books. Gail

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  5. They are spectacular. I have only ever seen the pure white, or pale pink varieties.

    My boss used to bring them down into the retail greenhouse each fall. They were a lovely addition to the fading light at the end of summer.

    Jen

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  6. Nell, Seeing all these beautiful flowers is enough to make me consider moving to the south where I could grow such wonders. (Oh, yeah, there's the small matter that I wilt in temperatures over 80F; so maybe not a good idea after all.) -Jean

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  7. I've been amazed at how tough these plants can be. We had a clump of white crinums that came with the house 20+ years ago. Even with no added summer water the plants survived and even bloomed on occasion. But with that kind of abuse the plants never looked good. I felt like a bit of an ogre when I finally took them out a couple months ago to make room for some native plants that would stay attractive in the dryland gardening situation that much of my garden has evolved into.

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  8. Just what I needed on a cold,cloudy day. They are so pretty and I love the Milk and Wine lilies.
    Happy New Year to you and may it be filled with your hearts desires.

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  9. I'd never heard of them! Then when I did some research, it said that they may be "unheard of up North" so I feel a little better. They are very pretty and I love flowers that bloom at night. Does anyone know of any species that bloom reliably in USDA zone 6a that don't take too much fuss?

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  10. sensational crinums - its been years since I've seen one - so thanks for bringing back some memories from yester years.

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  11. Beautiful collection of Crinums! We are planning on planting one (or two) next year, and I appreciate your sources so I can learn more about them. We had a speaker talk about them at a Garden Club meeting and that sparked our interest in them.

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  12. I've not met a crinum I did not like as they are such big rewarders!. Wishing you a great New Year.

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  13. Nell Jean,
    I love the string lily crinums paired with the colocasia. Beautiful blooms. The milk and wine lilies are wonderful! It is so great to see flowers when our view up here in the north is blanketed by snow.

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  14. Hello Nell Jean,

    I haven't seen Crinums before. Yours are beautiful and I love how many different shapes they come in. I would love any flower that smells like vanilla ;-)

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  15. Oooh, how pretty! I don't know crinums. Are they types of lilies?

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  16. No Southern garden should be without this most reliable of plants.

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  17. Hi;
    I've never heard of Crinums - quite lovely. That pale pink first flower photo took my breath away.

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  18. These are so pretty. I had not heard of them before. You are lucky to have had some there already. Thanks for showing them. I will look for some in the spring.

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  19. The crinums are lovely and seems to be holding their heads high. Very elegant.

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  20. I have a crinium which I planted about 2 years ago but it still hasnt flowered

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  21. Janet, that one that blooms out at night remains in bloom through the next day, unlike some night bloomers. The vanilla fragrance remains, as well. Of several buds, 3 or 4 may bloom at a time, extending the excitement. Rebloom is common throughout the summer, especially following heavy rains from tropical storms.

    Thank you all for commenting. So many of you have never seen them, either because they grow mostly in warm climates or because bulbs are not as commonly found as some other bulbs and tubers.

    James mentioned that they require much water. I failed to mention they are water hogs, growing well with cannas and other heat loving bulbs. That first picture might have given that away.

    Crinums are amarylliads, related to amaryllis, but not as easily brought to bloom in pots as amaryllis.

    For those who live in cold climates, true lilies might be a better choice.

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  22. What gorgeous flowers! So refreshing to see!!!
    All the best for the new year

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  23. I've never seen a string lily. What an interesting flower! I like them all, and not only their blooms, but the leaves too. Have a Healthy and Happy New Year, Nell Jean!

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  24. Wow, these crinums are gorgeous flowers with great foliage too.

    I love that foliage with the chocolate-edged leaves - is that the canna?

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  25. I linked to this post this morning. I wanted to remind myself later where this fabulous bulb came from. I had to go searching for emails.

    Mine is still green even with all the cold and frosts we've had. The salvias planted near them are frozen to the ground. The lavender doesn't look that good either, but the crinum just seems to shrug off the cold weather so far. Any clues as to how long it takes to bloom? The bulb, which I know can get huge, was only about 1" across when I planted it.

    Thanks for the great post. I love these kinds of plants where it seems you have to know someone who has them to get them.

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  26. Nell Jean, those are some gorgeous blooms. I have what is supposed to be C. rattrayi, but I'm still not sure if that's correct. I should send a picture to Dr. Joe when it blooms.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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