Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Food for the Body and the Soul

The latest poll is on my Sidebar. When spring finally comes, which of the following will you have in your garden: Vegetables, Fruits, Herbs, Cutting Flowers? The poll is broken down  into several categories. Some of us just tuck some veggies here and there. Some have a formal Potager, an Arbor for grapes, or Stone fruit trees. Tell us what edible delights grow in your garden, while we wait for warmer weather. A kitchen garden catalog was in my mailbox today.

Pears, in August
















Unripe Figs, in May

















Scuppernong Grapes in August



What do you anticipate in the garden in 2010?

15 comments:

  1. Hi Nell~~ I can't imagine my garden without raspberries. I grow 'Autumn Bliss.' They start producing in early July and go until frost. Raspberries don't keep very well. In fact they don't make it to the house. Nothing is more blissful than carrying a bouquet of honeysuckle and mingling with the bumblebees as we both enjoy a feast. Strawberries and blueberries are also on the menu. I've got a geriatric pear tree but I sort of ignore it.

    Hurry up spring!

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  2. Besides the usual tomatoes, green beans, and squash, I have planted sweet onions the last couple of years. I was inspired to do this because wild onions do very well in my yard. I have never been a big onion fan, till I grew my own. They taste much better than store bought, and now i can't imagine not having them.

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  3. I am growing pineapples, calamansi, promegranate, medicinal herbs, spices and vegetables as food for the body and the soul.

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  4. Well for the vast majority of 2010 we won't have a garden!!!! Shock. We ove out of this house in a few weeks and then in with the mother in law (who we've got growing fruits of all types and a few veggies). It's just the allotment for now and everything edible we can fit in there (and some cut flowers too).

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  5. Container plants! I have a lot of pots of all sizes that the previous homeowner left. Container gardening is relatively new to me so I've been reading up on it in preparation for spring.

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  6. Nell, I have a Potager or Kitchen Garden. It is a mix of fruit, veg, cutting flowers and I also use a portion of it as a nursery bed for cuttings or a holding bed for plants I am not sure what to do with. It is the first garden I built and the most useful!

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  7. Hi Nell, at my elevation of 7300' it is hard to grow warmth loving vegetables like tomatoes and peppers, but I try anyway. I have lots of herbs, lettuce, carrots, beans and a few others in the vegetable gardens. Strawberries, Apples, and that about it. Herbs also fill many areas of my perennial gardens. Kathy

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  8. Good Morning Nell,

    I'm expanding my container garden this year. I'm planning to grow more tomatoes, green beans, fewer peppers, and a container of lettuces. I'm an herb lover, both growing and using. The rosemary I'm babying this winter, along with many other herbs will join the vegetables.

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  9. You have the most interesting polls. :)

    I've just started the serious planning. Winter is such an exciting time for the garden. What will be chosen? Will even half of the wish list plants fit in the garden? What won't make the cut? And this year, I have catalogs, too! Hope you're enjoying the planning and looking forward to growing season.

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  10. Tomatoes. Tomatoes. Maybe some more tomatoes. I've got a Belle of Georgia peach tree, Morris Plum, montmorency cherry, black mission and brown turkey figs with Marseilles white on the way in the form of cuttings. I'll have squash and cucumbers. Maybe some butterbeans, definitely some pole beans, Golden Wax and an unknown purple or three. There will be tomatoes. I'll have herbs like basil, rosemary, cilantro. I've got carrot and cabbage seeds that need to be sown in a couple weeks. There are three kinds of seedless grapes in the backyard in need of a new trellis. I've got blueberries and blackberries that I hope will fruit this year. I'll also plant nasturtiums. The leaves are peppery and add a bit of zing to summer salads. Oh, and lettuce. And of course, some tomatoes.

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  11. Dreams of food crops always are more wonderful than the reality, but we still have them. I agree with Grace, the raspberries are the best, being able to eat them while standing right there in the sun, the fruit still warm. Beans and garlic and lettuce and...well the list is long. It feeds the soul as well. :-)
    Frances

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  12. I hope the parsley seeds I planted recently get to the devil and back while it's cold and will sprout timely. I forgot to mention host plants for butterflies, one of my most important notions.

    I also meant to ask about planting evergreen shrubs in your perennial borders for winter interest. Who does that?

    I do love to have tasty things on which to forage, in season. DH insists that we preserve things like figs and pears for winter. They are nice to have.

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  13. Hi, Nell! Veggie Garden Dreams are going on right now chez moi -- tomatoes, peas, beans, tomatoes, onions (Yes! They are wonderful from the garden!), chard, tomatoes, beets, mache, lettuce, basil, parsley, and tomatoes.

    I have three blueberry bushes which produce well, but there is a dynasty of catbirds which consider them their property and they chase me away if I try to get any ripe ones; I figure I can go to the store and they can't, and I like the catbirds, so we have reached a detente whereby they get all the berries.

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  14. Oh, I forgot -- little Japanese Ichiban eggplant in pots, dill, oregano, thyme, and tomatillos.

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  15. I'm renovating an old garden overgrown with rhubarb, cherries, and grapes, to which I plan to add the usual regime of vegetables (peas, beans, squash, corn, onions), plus some new things for canning and drying: strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and currants. I'm even delving into things said to grow here in the PNW that I've never tried before: high bush cranberry, seaberry, pawpaw, and a wonderous fruit called the medlar which is supposed to taste like cinnamon-apple.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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