Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Garden Boundaries

A new poll went up on my sidebar, this one is about inclosures. (You may prefer to say enclosures. I looked it up.) What are the boundaries of your garden?



Pecan trees. I forgot to ask who grows nuts in the previous poll.

Food for the Body and Soul poll indicated that more than half of us responding grow vegetables, half grow fruits, a quarter grow annual fruits like melons, more than a third have a cutting garden and almost two thirds have an herb garden.  Thank you to all who bother to vote in my polls which are for entertainment, not scientific.

Please comment here if you want to discuss your fences and hedges and walls and vistas after you visit the poll.




26 comments:

  1. We're building boundaries as we can with vegetation. Everything was pretty much wide open when we started. We added hemlocks along one side and some crape myrtles. Hopefully they will come into their own this year.

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  2. I've done a lot of clearing out with the existing vegetation. I'm letting the edges of the backyard flow into the more natural areas with shrubs and fruit trees. Flowers will be tucked here and there as I find the space.

    I have concrete on two edges of the perennial bed. I have a little wooded fence along another side of the driveway. I've got the neighbor's chain link that I'm desperate to hide. Plantings are already in place and just need time to grow and fill in.

    I have all sorts of edges. The lot dictates what happens and how I treat them.

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  3. I have a very small garden, so am try to grow right up against the wooden fence on each side. I have created a walkway behind plants at the back where there is a wire fence. I want to create the idea that there is still more to explore, so you dont really see the boundaries.

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  4. I am lucky to live in a place where the HOA actually prohibits fences that block other things out, to allow the wildlife to flow freely through the area. So, my boundaries are natural - scrub oak, ponderosa pine, native grasses. The only fence we have is an invisible one, to keep the dog in! Kathy

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  5. Tragically no back fence existed when we moved here 12 years ago. The neighbors' windows were much too close. That was November. By February my gracious hubby was building a six-foot tall fence. Fences make good neighbors!

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  6. Well, the city house is bounded by sidewalk in front, street in back, and, only partly, a decorative wrought-iron fence on the sides. But it's a long narrow lot and we are very close to our neighbors on either side. You could even say they are the boundaries! Good thing we get along with them! In the country, the house is carved out of the woods, so the boundary is mostly pine, oak, and native shrubs.

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  7. Vegetation boundaries would be nice, but my garden had to be protected from curious pups. This year, I'm thinking they can be trusted, so at least part of the fencing may be removed.

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  8. We have chain link mostly hidden with hedge. Chain link is to keep away neighbors sheep, chicken, ducks, turkeys... on one side where we have only hedge, ducks are constantly walking through it (so far I don’t mind).

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  9. No wattle here. First time I've heard the word and had to look it up to find out what it was.

    No fences, curbs or sidewalks in our neighborhood. We are on a corner and so we have the street on two sides, a wooded natural area on the west side and a long row of tall arbovites at the back.

    There is decorative concrete curbing around some of the beds.

    Would be nice to have a wooden fence with plants in front of it.

    donna

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  10. Our boundaries vary... the best one is the water across the back. Since I have dogs, I like having some fencing to keep them in their yard though it doesn't completely enclose the yard. Hoping to use hedging more in our new place.

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  11. Oh, dear! I left off water! Streams and lakes and the ocean make great boundaries. I also forgot drainage ditches as boundaries; we had one in our previous backyard.

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  12. These polls are fun, I love taking them.
    I garden to the sidewalk and to the privacy fences around our backyard. I'm thinking about asking my next door neighbor if I can plant in her piece of yard that is connected to mine on either side of our driveways.

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  13. You really are the queen of polls!
    Another good one here. I have split rail fencing with natural material surrounding it. I would prefer more privacy so I'm working on that with plantings rather than more fencing...

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  14. Ah, good old Georgia Pecans! I baked about 10 of them during the holidays for friends. Finally got around to baking us one this past weekend! Yum, they are good.

    I have a chainlink fence and woods as my boundries....

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  15. Mine begin as typical rail fences but then I plant honeysuckles, clematis and trumpet vines to pretty them up a bit. On the side of the property that faces Mr. Grumpy's house, we plant heirloom hollyhocks ~ a 15 foot fence is a marvelous way to avoid his scowls in summertime. :)

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  16. Pecan trees are great. Where I grew up, a pecan tree was often planted to commemorate the birth of a child. I think those practices are long gone now as people rarely stay in the "home place" for generations.

    I have inner and outer gardens, so there's a mix of aluminum fencing for the cottage garden; growing a holly hedge for the parking area garden; buddleias for the dry stream garden edge; osmanthus for other garden areas; cryptomeria to separate the waterfall garden from the fragrance garden, etc.

    Cameron

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  17. I wasn't quite sure which answers to pick. Most of the garden beds have an edging of gathered rocks. The main vegetable beds have a simple vinyl covered metal fence, but that's not really a boundary. It's to keep out critters and deer. I have growing areas around the outside of the fence, also. The house and the driveway are boundaries, as well as the neighbors' fence and yard. One side has a strip of smallish evergreens, but I haven't begun to garden that area, yet. When I do, the evergreens will be removed and replaced with something else, probably rhododendrons and azaleas, along with other perennials.

    Oh, I suppose my husband's lawn is a boundary for some of my gardens, but I like to think that's just temporary. :)

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  18. We have an effective concrete panel fence. The grey of the concrete blends with aluminium window frames and powder coated matt grey roof. Open panels distributed around the garden for wildlife, and our cats. We enjoy our garden in relative privacy, and prefer to keep neighbours dogs on their side of the wall. And the shrubs and trees will be taller after next winter!

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  19. The only problem I have is that my front yard is a dog park for about 8 different dogs who live on my street. I may have to put up some kind of fence, but I think the tomato cages will be enough to discourage them from cutting through.

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  20. This may turn into a vent. chain link separates us from the neighbors. I try to be understanding b/c there was a time I did not garden and couldn't tell a weed from a flower, but now that I do, the morning glories, wild grapevines, honeysuckle, English Ivy and poison ivy that grow from their side over the fence and on to my side is really a nuisance. I'd go over there and weed, but I neither want them to feel bad about it, nor want more work! grrrr.

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  21. Wished my garden boundaries are limitless but reality is its a very small space - cemented and bare.
    What makes the whole thing green are my container garden.

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  22. Gosh I hate it when comments don't go through! I live on seven acres, with hayfields to the south of us and woodlands to the west and north of our land. So it's a very freeflowing space, interrupted only by the paddock and pasture for Jenny and Leggo. I'm very very lucky.

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  23. I have two old quintessential New England stone walls on my property, one as my front border and the other in the back. The other two boundaries are a mix of shrubs and hemlocks. I like the sense of enclosure they provide and the backdrop they provide to my other plantings.

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  24. Nell I think your greenhouse is amazing. Such colour in there!

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  25. Our house backs on to a small, no outlet street and the builder put in a wall, separating the houses from the street. So we've got the wall along the back (an expanse of beige until we get something growing up it. On either side we have the standard 6 foot privacy fence. I'm so looking forward to getting some GREEN out there.

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  26. I love thinking about boundaries and reading about them. Tara has a pic of a house with a picket fence on her blog today.

    I'm about to hack a new pathway through some azalea bushes, when Buffy and I get to it. Work goes slowly when throwing tennis balls takes
    priority.

    Thank you, everybody who commented and took part in the poll.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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