Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Rhododendron alabamense, and other Native Azaleas part III

R. alabamense. Notice the yellow blotch which distinguishes this azalea.



Alabamense at Ichauway Plantation, 2006

Yellow hybrid from the Varnadoe collection

Native azaleas April, 2009 at Ichauway Plantation

If you missed the first two posts on Native Azaleas, they can be found here:


There are 26 species of rhododendrons and azaleas native to north America.

American native azaleas were being exported to England in 1736.
Chinese azaleas were brought to America in 1855 to develop cold hard varieties.

The azaleas in my garden are all hybrids developed from the Asian cultivars, except for one Alabamense not photogenic at all right now with tight, tight buds and a yellow native.
We expect azalea blooms late this month and into April. 

12 comments:

  1. Hi Nell. I love your azalea's. You have quite a few around your property. It is probably a good thing I only have an acre. LOL! I have a baby Golden Lights that has yet to bloom. Maybe this will be the spring it does.
    Lona

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  2. I love all the Azaleas in your three posts. The white and yellow ones look so dainty. thanks for sharing!

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  3. I've heard of native azaleas and they really are beautiful. The problem is...where do you buy them? I've never seen them in a nursery...what a shame.

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  4. As I said before, these are my pictures, but the azaleas are from Ichauway Plantation where I've been privileged to visit. In another post, Rainey asked who is Ms. Lillian? She's a retired schoolteacher in her eighties, who enjoys the educational presentations at Ichauway.

    I made a note to Susan on her own blog about sources: private nurseries, and specialty nurseries in larger cities. There are nurseries on the web who sell Native Azaleas.

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  5. the harbinger of spring! I'm still waiting for my rhody to do it's thing - been a few years though...

    I LOVE that fun poem - and what a good idea to turn it into a poll - looks like the cause of death is varied!

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  6. NellJean,

    Thanks for this post. I'd never really paid much attention to native azaleas before and these are wonderful. They make me want to investigate them for addition to my garden.

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  7. I have always enjoyed the beauty of azaleas, although they have a hard time growing in our alkaline soil.

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  8. Azaleas.....another reason to move south. We lived in SC for a short time and I still remember how pretty the azaleas looked in March/April.

    donna

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  9. The yellow azalea almost looks like a giant Cleome flower! :D

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  10. OH! The Yellow Bird stole my heart!

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  11. And a lot of these native azaleas have such wonderful smell. So far the two I have in my garden are alive and beginning to show buds. I really hope they become established and do well. I lost many during the drought of 2007, but if these two prosper I will plant more.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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