Saturday, April 3, 2010

Southwest Georgia Native Plants

3
Not a comprehensive list, just pics of some that bloom this time of year.

Baptisa -- False Indigo

My baptisia is late this year, with fat buds about to open.

These others are plants on my wanted list. 

Florida Anise

Wild phlox

Lyreleaf Sage

Oakleaf Hydrangea has new leaves, with a tiny bud in each leaf cluster.
I put a pic in my Dotty Plants blog  last Wednesday of a bud.
Hydrangea quercus deserves a whole post of its own, once the blossoms appear.

What natives are in your garden?


13 comments:

  1. Oak leaf hydrangea, black eyed Susans, conefowers, coreopsis, heuchera, and probably a few others I've forgotten about are in the garden here. Not all are native to my area though.

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  2. Natives -- the same phlox as in your picture which surprises me! Such a diverse growing ability for that little darling! Plus, strawflowers, tons of wild asters, sego lilies, blanket flowers, dame's rocket and one breathtaking blue flower I've never been able to identify. The horses gobble it before I have a chance to take a picture... :))

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  3. Hi Nell. I have Dame's Rockets or wild phlox, Jack in the Pulpit near the woods,Cornflowers,ferns and Spring Beauties are all over the yard near the woods. Some of them found there way around a Rose bush also. I am starting Milk Weed from seeds for the butterflies.
    I think the Anise plant is so pretty and the Sage will be wonderful.
    Have a wonderful weekend.
    Lona

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  4. I am in the process of planting all new PNW native shrubs and perennials in my brand new redone back yard. However, I'm sure my natives are very different form yours. For shrubs, I have Ribes sanguineum, Physocarpus capitatus, Lonicera involucrata, Cornus sericea, Sambucus racemosa, Vaccinium ovatum, Acer circinatum, Corylopsis spicata, and Rhodocendron occidentale. Have plans to add even more!

    The other day I was at a local nursery in the natives section, where a woman was asking the helpers if they had "sweetshrub"! I almost said, "that's an East Coast native, you probably won't find it here," but I didn't want to butt in.

    I need to do a post on my blog about the native perennials I am planting.

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  5. That Florida anise is gorgeous. Is it fragrant too?

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  6. Alison, there is a western sweet shrub, Calycanthus occidentalis. I wonder if it smells as good as ours?

    Diana, Florida anise flowers smell like fish, not pleasant at all up close. The leaves smell of anise, very fragrant.

    Kate, you might want to do a search for 'plants horses eat' to make sure it isn't bad for them. Could it be spiderwort? Fairly showy, looks like clumps of grass? Or the smaller grasslike sisyrinchium, blue eyed grass.

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  7. Right now it is bluebonnets galore. I think we have the false indigo here too. I saw it last year at the Wildflower Center so it must be native. I would love to have some in my garden.

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  8. Oh, I love native plants--have a LOT of them, in the garden, around the edges of the pond, the paddock, the pasture... The first to bloom will be the hepatica, or liverwort, in about two weeks time, I suspect. It's pretty much extirpated in the wild in Nova Scotia, but I got mine about a decade ago from a native nursery that propagated many plants from seed. We have trilliums, wild ginger, mayapples, jack in the pulpit, and many more yet to perform in our garden.

    Horses are usually (stress USUALLY) pretty good about not eating things that are bad for them. Unlike cows. (I've written a number of articles on plants toxic to horses because, well, I'm a worrywort. Won't have a yew on my property even though the chance of Leggo or Jenny escaping the pasture, making a beeline for one highly toxic shrub and eating it is less than me winning the lottery. But I still refuse to grow it.

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  9. Oh I want one of those Florida Anise's! I have 3 native hollies, coralbean, wild lime, firebush, (had seagrape) leather fern, ressurection fern, slash pine, everglades palm, saw palmetto, 2 magnolia species, wild blueberry, fetterbush, mangrove, coontie, wild coffee... and so forth.

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  10. As many as I can get to grow! I love them and they are what make C&L the garden it is....My favorites right now in bloom~~Phacelia bipinnatifida/Scorpionweed, False Rue anemone, rue anemone, phlox divaricata, trillium, trout lily, Dutchman's Britches and Mayapple. We can grow so many of the same wildflowers...although you are a few weeks ahead of us, gail

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  11. I just popped by to wish you a very Happy Easter,

    RO xxx

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  12. Asters, coreopsis, purple coneflowers, blazing stars, black-eyed susans, columbine, butterfly weed, cardinal flower, lupine, phlox...these come to mind.

    Hope your day is lovely, NellJean.

    donna

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  13. More and more natives are finding homes in our garden in the last few years. We have asters, trilliums, coneflowers, columbine, baptisia, rudbeckia, prairie smoke, butterfly weed, penstemon, phlox, Joe Pye weed, geraniums, false Solomon's Seal, ruellias, and others, plus a bunch of native shrubs too.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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