Thursday, June 24, 2010

Natives and Wildflowers in Garden and Meadow

Common natives, Echinacea and Black Eyed Susans.


Baptisia, the native white, was splendid in the spring garden. These seed pods turned black and dry last week and I gathered them. I am going to plant the little peas inside while they are fresh.


Ratibida from seed. Sometimes there are solid yellow plants, wonderful with Salvia farinacea. 'Victoria' Salvia farinacea from seed, and cuttings from the seedlings.



When I cut off the dried blooms of Oakleaf Hydrangea, new buds and blossoms were underneath.

Butterflies found the first blooms of Phlox paniculata.

Gulf Fritallary butterflies host plant is Passiflora, above.
These are growing with lantana, below.

Edge of the meadow is a natural butterfly garden.
Lantana, passiflora and beautyberry planted themselves.


Beautyberry with bright purple berries is a hit in fall.
Butterflies and beneficials visit the flowers in late spring and early summer.

I have not been able to identify this plant with tiny blue blossoms growing in sunny meadows.
Below is a pic of the whole plant, little more than a foot tall.

 
Flowers and text are from the garden of Nell Jean at http://www.seedscatterer.blogspot.com/ in the hot, humid depths of Southwest Georgia USA where Lily fragrance floats on the breeze and Mockingbirds scold from the grape arbor. Join us in a glass of iced Ruby Tea, dark and barely sweet, in the shade of a pecan tree.

19 comments:

  1. So many beauties among the natives - maybe common, but certainly to be cherished!

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  2. You've highlighted some great plants. That leaf on the last plant looks familiar.

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  3. Your garden has such a nice naturalistic look to it. I love the header photo...what is that animal hanging from the branch? It looks like a cat.

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  4. It's a monkey, Susan. Not a real monkey, he's hung there for years.

    My old web site has directions for making a monkey.

    Make a Monkey

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  5. I love to see wild flowers, in the most unusual places. I saw some growing in abundance, beside the freeway through Seattle, I think beautifying the roadside is an excellent idea.

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  6. Today is hot and steamy ... I'd love to sip tea with you in the shade of a pecan tree, and admire your beautiful meadow.

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  7. I love your ' Victoria" , Nell Jean! Such delicate cool blue color.

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  8. Hello Nell,

    Your garden is truly beautiful this time of year. I particularly love your purple coneflowers and daisies....some of my favorite plants :-)

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  9. Ah, the wildings... I imagine a garden planted with nothing but wildings from around the world! Thanks for sharing! Jack

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  10. What a vision of natural beauty, Nell Jean! Your Ratibidias have me green with envy. I will try the seed sowing method you suggested this year, thanks. Maybe the yellow is a stouter fellow, we have both. :-)
    Farnces

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  11. Oh what was lovely (black eyed susans are one of my favs) and boy would I love to be sitting with you there under a pecan tree - one can but dream

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  12. What a wonderful tour. Great echinacea. And I love how green it is!

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  13. My favorites, all! This is a wonderful tour, indeed. I love the BES and the Mexican hats, especially. Also the coneflower.....

    The monkey looks happy in this garden.

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  14. Nell Jean - I would love to have Lantana grow as a native, but in zone 5 that won't happen. Will just have to stop by and see how your gardens grow.... :D -Shyrlene

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  15. Beautiful! The butterflies must love your garden!

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  16. Hi Nell Jean: Been out of it for a few days so I just read your latest posts: Enjoyed my visit as usual, love your photos.

    Enjoy your gardens,
    John

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  17. Hi Nell Jean: Been out of it for a few days so I just read your latest posts: Enjoyed my visit as usual, love your photos.

    Enjoy your gardens,
    John

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  18. Love the wild flowers. Sitting under that pecan tree sounds heavenly. We have been sitting in the shade of an old apple tree lately in the early morning enjoying our coffee.

    We all need to do that more!

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  19. lots of pretty things going on here! I'm always tempted to gather seeds from the baptisia - they look so inviting.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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