Sunday, July 4, 2010

Pick Up Sticks

Every stroll in the garden includes picking up sticks. When there are old, big trees, there are always fallen branches and twigs after the least wind.

It's the time of year when weeds disguise themselves by growing very close to another plant, then suddenly blossoming at the top when they reach the light.

Red, White and Blue:


Brazillian Ruellia


Oakleaf Hydrangea rebloom



A day of celebration, the  Birthday of our Country. We sang patriotic hymns at Church this morning, which was also the day designated as Homecoming. I don't stay for lunch and fellowship because I'm not from this community and the folks who 'come home' are mostly strangers to me. It was precious that the morning speaker, a young man in seminary, was the great-grandson of one of the 'founding fathers' of this particular congregation.

An explosion of bright colors in celebration in the garden:




If you look closely to the right of the Pride of Barbados in
bloom, there is my stick pick-up helper, Buffy.

9 comments:

  1. It's nice to have a helper that picks up sticks. I could use one of those since we've also got lots of sticks from our Live oaks. How neat to have a speaker descended from one of our founding fathers. Hope you had an enjoyable 4th.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Happy fourth, Nell Jean. Always picking up sticks... especially from the neighbor's overhanging oak tree they never trim. :-) Love that your oak leaf hydrangea rebloomed. Wish mine would.
    Meems

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nell Jean - that "Bride of Barbados" is SO cool, a new plant to put in my plant list to check up on.

    Buffy is too cute - and such a big helper! I have a cottonwood tree next door in the neighbor's yard that would keep her busy everyday (that tree makes me crazy). Nice post - like a restful virtual walk-about. Happy 4th! -Shyrlene

    ReplyDelete
  4. Happy 4th! After seeing what you can do with those sticks (on your blog) I now pick them up. I am going to attempt the twig design that you made in front of your blanket flowers on a previous post. I did make a twig holder (lack of better word) for my Senorita Rosalita Cleome ... so it will hold up in the wind. Your celebration flowers are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  5. My 'helper' still helps by digging holes. I guess I could bury the twigs?

    I love the soft colors of the tritoma.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hope you had a wonderful 4th. Sticks, what sticks? Oh, those things that fall on the ground when you actually have shade in the garden! :-) We do have woods, but I don't venture there in the summer due to ticks from all the deer. My corkscrew willow and weeping willow produce interesting sticks, but I've never gathered enough to weave anything. I use the corkscrew branches inside for decoration in a pottery urn.

    ReplyDelete
  7. We always have sticks to pick up.

    The Pride of Barbados is beautiful. I don't have sun or room enough in the fenced yard. And, outside the fence our deer little friends like to eat the blooms.

    Thanks for sharing yours.

    ReplyDelete
  8. sticks everywhere here too. we call that ragin cajun ruellia...

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well, now I am mad. I can't see the POB picture, so I can't see how cute Buffy is.

    We have had a lot or rain, about 12" or more in a 4 day period. We lost most of the vegetable garden, even though the garden is raised beds. Nine of the 12" came to us in about 5 hours.

    The weeds love it, and so do most of my plants. Some things that I thought were dead sprang back to life. I think that shows real appreciation of the rain. LOL

    I love that hydrangea!

    ReplyDelete

I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



Google+ Followers