Saturday, August 28, 2010

The Survey Commences

Cloudy weather brought us a little cooling with humidity from the rain. Working outside leaves one kind of damp. Summer is still with us. I cleaned out the stump bed where Guly Muhly edges the side next to the driveway.

Pentas behind Gulf Muhly.
That awful grass with the star-shaped seed heads went to seed while I wasn't paying attention.
I pulled it all out along with dozens of weeds and put down fresh pine straw
raked from the other side of the yard. Some Melampodium was pulled to
make more room for Duranta that has decided to grow and bloom.

Gone to seed and dead is the frilly gaillardia from seed. I sprinkled seed heads just in case.
At the top of the mound are five Lantana montevidensis that started out as rooted cuttings.

I cut back some dying lily stalks and ugly Shasta daisy stalks. 
As best I can tell, all the Stokesia died out. It does that some years. 
It will come back as little seedlings here and there and we will start over next spring.

Late August is a discouraging time in the garden when there was a drought.
If you look close, there is new rose growth, blooms on Loropetalum, signs of impending
bloom among the fall blooming salvias. Red leaves on sassafras signals fall coming.


A mandevilla shares the grape arbor with ripening scuppernong grapes.

I sprayed the wasp nests in the greenhouse (I'm allergic).
Ike the Cat is eager to start moving back in as soon as the weather cools a little more.

15 comments:

  1. The grass with star shaped seed heads is quite a familiar sight over here... and they hold the soil so tight! ~bangchik

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  2. I love those scuppernongs and muscadines. I'll occasionally sneak some wild ones off the roadsides too!

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  3. It's been a rough summer. I like your attitude though. It all comes in cycles.

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  4. We expected rain yesterday and today, but missed it somehow. Not a drop in sight, so tomorrow will be a watering day, all day. Probably tomorrow night, we will get a flood. That will be o.k. with me.

    My rose of Sharon are blooming beautifully. I have one that has huge white blooms with a dark purple center. I have never seen it bloom such large blooms before. It is beautiful. I also have a pink one, small, double, frilly blooms, so many blooms the bush looks pink all over. It is also lovely.

    I did not see stoksia this year. I wonder if the drought and hard winter got it. Drat!

    I do wish it would rain tonight. My plants love rainwater most!

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  5. We are starting to plan our trip back to SW Georgia - leaving WA state Sept 23. I can't wait to see what has survived in our absence. It has been really nice to follow the summer there through your blog!

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  6. No rain here either. I need to get out and start cleaning up too, but will wait for some cooler weather!

    My little loropetalum is beginning to bloom too. It has had very little additional water this year and is very small. I almost forgot about it.

    I hope we all have a better gardening season next year!

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  7. We need rain too. It has been an awful hot and humid summer with little liquid sunshine. It's always amazing what can survive in times like these. You still have some lovely blooms happening there in your gardens. I'm sure looking forward to cooler weather.

    FlowerLady

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  8. Dear Nell Jean, Sorry I haven't visited lately ... I was in England with no internet connection. And while I was gone "and not paying attention" so much went to seed! It makes this a very busy time of the year. Enjoy the rest of the summer. Pam

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  9. We also have that awful grass with the star-shaped seeds heads - must be truly international. We've had so much rain here that everyone's tomato and apple/pear harvest is suffering. The weather never seems to be exactly right for us gardeners.

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  10. Hi, Nell Jean! I'm impressed with your grapes. Mine never ripen...probably due to the squirrels or something. My mandavilla seems to be struggling right now too...Not sure if it's the heat or if it needs to be relocated. It gets the hot afternoon sun. Regarding the muhly, I rather like it, although not in my yard. I find the star shaped seed shoots very interesting. I like to take macro shots of them.

    Hope you're safe from the forthcoming hurricanes. Earl looks rather large and heading more your way than mine. (turning north before it can hit FL) Be safe!

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  11. Hi, Nell Jean;
    I am not ready for autumn, this summer was so fleeting. Your mandevilla is very pretty.

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  12. Nell Jean - that 'season end' survey is so relate-able. It's been blistering hot here and just today it's only 60 degrees so far. So it's time to take a 'Tour de France' around the garden and start uprooting the dandelions that have been avoided! Those grapes look scrumptious! --Shyrlene

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  13. I SO agree late August is a sad time in the garden. This drought has sure taken its toll. I'm with you on the lantana though and will be planting more next summer. You have a spectacular grove of it in the post below. The pentas look great too.

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  14. Aha, whenever I see weeds, it is my challenge to pull them all out. Very therapeutic. A wasp nest? Oh, that's scary!

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  15. I found your blog while following along in the Hyacinth thread of Garden Web. Lovely things in your garden. Still trying to get mine more of how I want it to be. We've had a dry August here too, but we did get a decent couple of rains that have just made some of the plants come alive better than before. A few of the trees are starting to turn & the dogwoods are getting redder.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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