Friday, May 13, 2011

How Nature Plants a Butterfly Garden

The post by this name was assembled and scheduled on Wednesday for publishing early this morning. The recent blogspot problem swallowed it up. It has not returned. I'll tell you the story.


video

The wild Butterfly Garden here was planted by Nature, facing south. 
It gets no fertilizer, no irrigation, no maintenance except for controlled burns to control woody growth and a mown path along the edge for up-close viewing.

There is erigeron in the open spaces. I saw no butterflies on that.


One of three bays of Lantana. Wild cherry trees behind. Erigeron at left.

Native Passiflora in the next bay.

Lantana, passiflora, beautyberry here. I saw a paw paw nearby.


Lantana up close.

The corner patch has lots of lantana with pipevine growing nearby.
Among the butterflies I saw were mostly Pipevine Swallowtails and
an occasional Buckeye and Duskywing. I saw one Zebra Swallowtail. 
Later in the summer I expect to see Black Swallowtails and Gulf Fritillaries.

Notice the pipevine has been chewed some.
That's Chinaberry it is climbing.

No lantana grows on the north side of the woods.


video

17 comments:

  1. I haven't seen too many butterflies, yet. I just planted some more lantana...it sure did irritate my arm..ugh! It is tough as nails.

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  2. I just love lantana. Here in Indiana it is a "special" annual, meaning it costs more than others. I'd like to start some from seed next winter so I can enjoy more of it.

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  3. It is beautiful Perhaps one day I will live in a place with a big wildflower meadow like yours...

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  4. The videos showed the title of you post pretty well. Butterflies were everywhere.

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  5. That passionflower just pops, doesn't it? Simply lovely.

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  6. I am trying to attract more butterflies. My dream would be to have a meadow like that.

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  7. Barbara clearly planted my garden with butterflies in mind, but I don't know much about how to identify them--and there are plenty. Is there an easy way to educate myself about them? A web site, maybe...

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  8. I didn't realize how important blogging had become to me until Blogger went down! Thanks for the tour of your butterfly meadow.

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  9. Nature's butterfly gardens are so natural and serene-a perfect spot for all.

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  10. LOVE the lantana, so pretty and dainty looking, and I especially like the video of all your butterfly visitors. We have one butterfly bush which gets a decent amount of visitors, but I'd like to plant some more things that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. I hope you get lots of butterflies this year! Do you ever see hummingbirds too?

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  11. Dear Nell Jean, Thank you for sharing your butterfly paradise! Beautiful posting. P. x

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  12. Where is this beautiful place?

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  13. Lovely natural space. I enjoyed seeing it. I always enjoyed brush-hogging the fields and seeing all the butterflies and birds lighting on various plants around me.
    I often zigzagged around to leave the plants standing...

    I had blog issues too, couldn't post comments when I visited sites.

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  14. I haven't seen any butterflies yet here, the weather has been a bit iffy still. You have such a large amount of space to plant, the butterflies are so lucky. :)

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  15. I'm curious if you burn every year? We have an area in our yard that we let grow last year. I've been told it should be mown at least once per year or burned but haven't really bothered. I actually wouldn't mind if some trees moved in so not sure if any maintenance is really necessary.

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  16. Nature teaches us exactly what we need to plant! I added some New York ironweed to my garden last fall after seeing butterflies all over it when I was out peach picking. I'm looking forward to seeing if the same butterflies are attracted to it in my garden. I also added a pipevine. I hope it doesn't swallow my house!

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  17. You are so lucky to have so much property to experiment with and enjoy. It looks beautiful.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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