Friday, June 3, 2011

Got the Hydrangeas Let Me Down Blues

A unusually cold January left some of my  younger hydrangeas with many dead limbs
and a noticeable lack of blooms. First the good parts:

Hydrangeas at the birdbath are blooming as usual.

These were cuttings just stuck in the ground by the birdbath.
When they took and started to grow, I moved the birdbath.

Hydrangea serrata "Woodlanders" bloomed as usual.
Variegated 'Mariesii' lacecap did not bloom.

Can you see the ones in the background on the right? Blooming at the end of the porch, two
good big bloomers and one whose whole top parts died out.

These are the successful hydrangeas. They make me happy.

 
Oakleaf hydrangeas are done; blooms are in that 'pink' stage. Between the oakleafs are 4
mopheads. Ordinarily this time of year they'd be blooming with orange daylilies.

The daylilies bloomed without the hydrangeas.
Foliage is great, maybe they'll bloom later.

 
This would have been a red, white and blue
vignette if the hydrangea had bloomed.
Red gomphrena and white shrimp plant.

No blue. Stokesia failed to bloom as well.
Drought has not helped.

Hydrangeas under a live oak are listless, scant bloom.
Stick House in the background.

 
Hydrangea and fern.
All is not lost but there were too many of
those dead sticks you see at upper right.

Usually there is a second time of bloom if I deadhead instead of leaving the early blooms
to dry on the stems. I'm  hoping they will put on that second round as usual midsummer
and the ones that failed to bloom in May will produce blossoms.

Every year is different.

You can see last year's hydrangeas here blooming on June 2, 2010.



18 comments:

  1. We just never know what our plants will do. The drought is not helping anything is it? You do have some beautiful blooming hydrangeas to admire though.

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  2. The ones that did bloom are beautiful, though. Love that shade of blue!

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  3. I've had the same thing happen with my hydrangeas after a cold spell just as the buds were forming. This year I have several plants that aren't blooming well but think it's a result of drought and not cold.

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  4. My hydrangeas are small, one came with me from Virginia and two are Endless Summer variety. Since this kind of hydrangea blooms on old wood, perhaps this winter nipped the buds? Your oakleaf is gorgeous! What a great shrub.

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  5. "Every year is different." That's what I love about gardening... and the challenge of making my gardens beautiful each year despite the weather. I must admit though, sometimes I feel a little sad for what once was.

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  6. Gorgeous blooms! Sorry about the ones that didn't bloom, at least they grew and look green and luscious, mine are just at tiny bud stage (so far behind this year) Maybe next year you will be posting with bloom-overload to make up for this year ;)

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  8. I didn't know that one could just stick Hydrangea cuttings in the ground and the next thing you know you'll have lovely new plants..That's great!

    They are really cute, thanks for sharing those tips, it's good to know and to pass on.

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  10. Sorry to hear that your hydrangeas didn't bloom as usual. Thanks for the tip on cutting the flowers to get a possible 2nd bloom. I'll give it a try, and hopefully yours will reward you later this summer. Like that stick house in the background..very cool.

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  11. I sympathize with your situation.One of my hydrangea plants didn't make this year. Your plants are beautiful, though. Love that blue color.

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  12. Well, looks like some bloomed beautifully. Since it was the younger ones that didn't bloom reliably, perhaps that had more to do with it than the weather. Or maybe they'll bloom a bit late. Sorry they let you down.

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  13. Thanks, all. I should not have whined. I am grateful for the ones that bloomed on time and hopeful of late blooms.

    Vetsy, it is true that you can just 'stick this in the ground and it will grow.' It is an iffy proposition. A better plan is to use some good rooting soil in a pot, some rooting hormone and careful watering. Some of us just like to see what happens. I'm more careful with scarce cuttings but a broken limb is a good reason to stick a piece by the birdbath where the soil stays damp.

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  14. Your blues are gorgeous...I would die to get mine to bloom blue...I find I have the best luck with the native varieties and Endless Summer...ours are just starting to flower after this cold spring...I love that stick house

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  15. Glad to see the stick house is surviving!

    I think this year has been a curious gardening year. Some fruit trees didn't even bloom or had a few sporadic blooms. We didn't have a late frost either.

    My garden will be the latest one I have ever had....and that is a long time!

    In spite of your drought, I think your gardens look lovely.

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  16. In my experience, many young flowering shrubs don't bloom reliably. Still, the ones that are blooming are beautiful. I've been trying to train myself to appreciate the garden as it is, and not as I hoped it would be. My new motto is, "Celebrate what is."

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  17. What are blooming are beautiful Nell. You have quite a few blue ones. I am still sitting with my mouth open at your saying you stuck some branches in the ground and they rooted and grew. LOL! I have trouble trying to propagate them let alone trying to stick them into the ground.But now you know I am going to try it. LOL!

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  18. I long for my garden to be abundant with hydrangeas.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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