Thursday, June 30, 2011

Pods and Proliferations in Daylily Propagation

Daylilies are traditionally propagated in the garden by division of the plant fans. Planting seeds from pods that ripen on a daylily scape generally results in offspring with differences from the pod parent if fertilization resulted from pollen from another daylily cultivar.










Seed pod where dried bloom dropped off.

Dry seed pod and seeds.


Some daylilies develop new plants on the scape below where the blooms appeared. Those new plants are called proliferations. Roots will begin to form and the proliferation can be planted forming a new plant identical to the parent.

Proliferation on Salmon Sheen


Multiple prolifs on Salmon Sheen, each forms a clone of the plant.



All daylilies are not the same. Salmon Sheen is the only daylily that regularly has proliferations in my garden. This daylily was given to me as a handful of prolifs from Miss Billie's garden. I stuck them in the ground as she instructed and they grew.

I cut the scape above the forming prolif and leave it to grow as long as the scape below stays green. Even if roots fail to form, leaving a small piece of the scape to stick into the ground up to the base of the prolif usually results in rooting and growth when cut from the parent plant.

Instructions by a daylily expert on propagation by prolifs is on the web Here


Prolifs usually grow mid-scape after most of the blooms are spent.

8 comments:

  1. Interesting stuff and they are edible too.

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  2. That explains why I have daylilies sprouting up in unexpected places.

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  3. More daylilies? Your garden must be blooming nonstop. You have some very pretty varieties.

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  4. Thanks for the great info about Daylilies! Mine are about ready to bloom, too. They're so reliable.

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  5. I don't think I have ever seen a proliferation on any of mine, but I do enjoy planting the seeds. Often the difference is very minimal from the parent, but a difference just the same.

    Salmon Sheen is a pretty color.

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  6. You make it seem so easy! I like daylilies, I'm bookmarking this post so I can come back to it in case I ever get some pretty ones that I want to help propogate. :)

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  7. Today there are two re-bloomers and one late blooming daylily with 4 blossoms. Good ol' Salmon Sheen has new scapes.

    Quite often I look at new for me daylilies online and take lots of notes. I need landscape plants more than I need pretty faces in the garden, so I hold back.

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  8. Nell, The first of my daylilies just opened yesterday. I have propagated plants by division, and I can see some proliferations on some (although I didn't have the name for them before -- thanks), but I usually deadhead them and so have never tried propagating any from seed. It might be fun to try and see what I end up with. -Jean

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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