Friday, July 15, 2011

Okra Blossoms for Bloom Day in the Rain


When I went out to make my Bloom Day pics it was starting to rain and thundering.
I hurried to get okra bloom shots combined here with a previous days' picking.


Tithonia, Tecoma stans, Pride of Barbados and yellow Zinnias

Butterflies and their favorite delights were what I had hoped to show today.
 Those above are some from drier days this week. The following link is from Sunday. 


Other butterfly favs blooming here are Pentas, Duranta, Verbena on a Stick and Lantana.


Bloom Day is hosted by Carol of May Dreams Gardens. Visit Carol to show your Bloom Day blossoms and find many other Bloom Day posts.

25 comments:

  1. It always surprises me how nice Okra blossoms look - such a tough plant (And I'm quite jealous of your rain!). Happy GBBD.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aren't okra blossoms pretty? Sometimes it is a sad sight to see them drop...but I do love my okra! Happy GBBD!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Okra blooms are pretty. I am not a fan of eating okra. :-)

    Love the butterfly shot.

    Happy Summer Gardening ~ FlowerLady

    ReplyDelete
  4. I met up with okra by way of some Texas friends here in Oregon years ago. The blooms look a little like Rose of Sharon... My goodness this is a big country with lots of climates!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Happy GBBD! I love Tithonia, but it does not like the PNW. I have five seedlings that I have babied inside and then in my portable greenhouse. They are finally blooming in pots on my front porch, but it was not easy. They are desperate for some heat.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Happy GBBD! Love your bird of paradise shrub. I'm always surprised no pollinators feast upon it, but perhaps, it doesn't have a lot of nectar? I don't know. Aren't okra blooms so pretty? Just like the little hibiscus they are.~~Dee

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pretty flowers and yummy veggies in your summer garden...what more could a gardener want? Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I remember okra from my parent's garden. We always had it in the summer, fried or in in soups. Now I rarely see it, but it's something I miss. Maybe someday if I have a larger I garden I will plant it. Thanks for the memories and happy bloom day!

    ReplyDelete
  9. aloha nell

    i love okra blooms too and the good stuff, looks like a nice meal tonight :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hope you got a good rain out of that!

    Still no okra here; I have to wear a long-sleeve shirt to pick mine. The plant leaves itch the heck out of me!

    You don't grow garden phlox? The butterflies are covering mine these days.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Happy GBBD, Nell. The butterflies are mu favorite flying flowers in your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The Okra blossoms are lovely and I love your photo of the butterfly! Lovely!
    Happy GBBD :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. You have rain? Oh, my, you are so lucky. We've forgotten what that is like here in Texas.

    Love those okra blossoms! Who says veggies can't be beautiful?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nell! Send me some of that okra! and rain. thanks for stopping by the by hollyhock post. g

    ReplyDelete
  15. Oh how I LOVE okra blooms! Thanks for the beautiful reminder. Mine are hot and dry and stunted this year. As usual, are your other blooms are lush and lovely, too.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Okra blossoms make me think of gumbo. I hope you're cooking something yummy with the okra!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I simply love okra and their pretty flowers! I have 5 plants that are so productive I have to pick them everyday. I love to blanche the okras and eat like salad with our hot chilli paste!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Fried okra is one of my favorite things. I've planted some at my mother's house and it is doing good although I did see Japanese beetles on them a few days ago. Do they damage the okra itself?

    ReplyDelete
  19. It's difficult to find okra in the shops over here andI've never managed to grow it. Does it need special conditions? It may just be too cold over here. It's got a bonny flower too.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks to every one of you who visited. Okra is a hot weather plant. It needs very warm soil for planting, ample water and fertilizer and daily picking when the sun shines. About 20 plants give us enough to cook in 2 days' picking. We eat it boiled and buttered, fried and in soups.

    Later on Bloom Day the sun came out. Videos of butterflies fluttering on Tithonia are here:

    Butterfly Videos

    Have a great summer. Keep cool and wear a hat.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Love those okra blooms. And the butterfly plants of course. At least you're getting some rain!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Okra blooms are pretty. I enjoyed seeing your other blooms, too.

    I only have 1 tithonia that is doing well. It has a lot of stems sticking out of the sides. I'm thinking about cutting off some of the lower ones. Do you ever do that?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thanks for answering my question so quickly. When I went out this morning, I saw that one big "branch" of the tithonia was lying on the ground. I went ahead and cut off a few of the other bottom ones at the stem. Hopefully, it will grow taller now.

    It's 8:51 a.m. CDT, and 79 degrees. I'm not sure what the dew point is, but I came in because it's too hot to keep going out there. I'll slip out for a few minutes at a time to do a little more deadheading and such.

    Have a great day!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Is there a right size for cutting them from the plant? I have one large one, and about 6 others sprouting. I don't know if I should cut the one or leave it for the others. The large one is about 5" long and 3-4" wide at the stem. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  25. We cut whatever is about 3-4 inches long and sometimes cut the 2" ones for boiling. If you've more than 3 plants, you will probably always miss one that aligns itself with the stem and gets longer. I cut them no matter how long they get, if they don't slice easily, they're too tough.

    I gather whatever is the right size and put in the veggie drawer of the refrigerator until I have enough to fry, or boil or there's only 3-4 put them in soup or in lima beans.

    ReplyDelete

I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



Google+ Followers