Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Rhythm in the Woods and Fields

Some of our best fall color comes from Sassafras and,
shown here Sumac -- not the poison kind.


It's hard for me to find a poem that is suitable for our Autumn. We have no birches, no firs, no snow, no flaming woods, just an occasional brilliantly colored small tree, lots of green and we do have Harvest.

"There is music in the meadows, in the air --
Autumn is here;
Skies are gray, but hearts are mellow,
Leaves are crimson, brown, and yellow;
Pines are soughing, birches stir,
And the Gipsy trail is fresh beneath the fir.
 
There is rhythm in the woods, and in the fields,
Nature yields:
And the harvest voices crying,
Blend with Autumn zephyrs sighing;
Tone and color, frost and fire,
Wings the nocturne Nature plays upon her lyre."
- William Stanley Braithwaite, Lyric of Autumn
 

I'll take you on the Gypsy trail to Sweet gums in the distance.

Mayhaw trees around a dry pond.

Ancient Live Oak

Many of our trees stay green during the winter and will shed
old leaves in late winter to bring forth new pale green leaves.
Grasses and shrubs reveal fall is here.

A beautyberry grove, not as vigorous after a drought.

Sweet gums with brilliant leaves

Sweet gums populating woods' edge with beautyberry behind.

Caught the light just right on the dead tree.


My favorite for red, black gum against live oaks and
Spanish moss.

A wild duck obviously hit a high power electric
line; feathers and bones were all that were left
by predators, and his pretty head for identification.

 Baccharis with silky down among wild
grapevines and golden rod.

Eragrotis, purple Love Grass dots the far meadow.

Home again where the field road comes in above
the Upper Garden. Leaves on the grape arbor are
yellow; blueberries and pears have little color.
Pecans are falling in the distance.







Secrets of a Seedscatterer         

10 comments:

  1. I especially like these old trees...so much character. And you have photographed them in the most flattering way.

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  2. Isn't the sumac just gorgeous in the fall? And I love sweetgums for their beautiful fall color, too. But, your last picture of the road curving in the distance, and your description of pecans falling is wonderful.

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  3. I nice tour! Love the Live Oak, Spanish Moss...tranquil.

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  4. I love the red of the sumac against the live oaks and Spanish moss.

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  5. Fall color is hit and miss in Florida!

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  6. i love the picture of the sweet gum
    it would be interesting to take one picture from the same spot every season.

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  7. oh yes neat idea, I must try to find a few fall colored leaves here in Mouseville...
    your pictures are wonderful, even the pile of feathers, sad for the duck, but another walked away with a full belly :)
    And thank you for visiting my humble blog, I so appreciate every visitor :)
    Happy Gardening,
    Evelyn

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  8. Lovely photos and nice tour of your property. I especially liked the photo of the live oak. We have no fall color here in the desert. Some trees lose their leaves, but the leaves just turn brown and fall off.

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  9. It's so great to see trees with their leaves still attached. Ours are now pretty bare.You would never see Spanish moss here and the sumac trees have only their berries. I don't think sweet gums can handle zone 4. Here the middle of the day is warm but cold comes at night and we wake up to frosty mornings. Thanks for the lovely tour! It is beautiful there!

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  10. This has been an amazing fall in Kentucky. We had a road trip this weekend down to Savanna and it was hard to keep our eyes on the road, due the color on the "hills". I loved your pics!

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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