Saturday, November 15, 2014

November Bloom Day not Unlike Last Year

In 2013 I wrote:
The expected freeze happened [the night before Bloom Day], just enough frost to blacken things like Brugmansias, Daturas and Periwinkles in open ground. I pulled many things like Melampodium in anticipation so I wouldn't have to see dead plants..

Hearty Camellia sasanqua is not affected that much, still heavy with white blossoms. Freezing temperatures were for a short time and only one night, so we bravely soldier on.
 Last night's freeze was about an hour of cold just enough to make tender leaves twist and blacken. Some protected areas still boast blooms.

Brugmansias on the south side of the house still have blooms. Those on the other side of the driveway have dropped all color.



White Shrimp

Salvia leucantha under pines frames a dry Hydrangea bloom.

Scattered rose blooms persist.

Gulf Muhly is not as spectacular as it was a week ago. Lantana montevidensis will persist until a really hard freeze. Melampodium was protected by the Duranta above it, also still blooming,  Melampodium in the open ground is blackened. 

Duranta persists


White Camellia Sasanqua

Camellias, our winter standby. C. sasanqua starts the season.

Visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens to link up and visit other Bloom Day blogs.

20 comments:

  1. Such beautiful blooms. I love the Camellia and the Brugmansias. Just divine!

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  2. You have wonderful flowers still! The Brugmansia makes my heart skip a beat....fringed in pink. How awesome!

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  3. Next year I hope I remember your wisdom in pulling plants before they get frozen and turn to mush. It's a hard decision to make -- savor the blooms until the plants die, or pull them ahead of time to save yourself the heartache of seeing them dead in the ground. One of my Brugs produces pink flowers, but the only ones that still have buds are all creamy white.

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  4. I love your Brugmansias and the lovely Camellias. Gorgeous!

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  5. You have some amazing plants still flowering, such a variety. Your Camellia and brugmansia are so beautiful, I can just imagine the perfume from both of them!

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  6. Same thing happened here...the night before was very cold but no frost, this morning was a completely different story.

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  7. Happy GBBD Jean! I'm glad the cold snap didn't take all your beautiful blooms. I love the white Camellia sasanqua and hope to find a place for one or more in my own garden next year now that I have more shaded areas available due to removal of some lawn. As always, I'm impressed by your Brugmansia - my one plant, in a large pot for close to a year, has yet to produce a single bloom.

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  8. Oh those Brugmansias--drool, they are just gorgeous. And the camellias are so lovely. Do they bloom through the winter? I didn't know that. Enjoy!

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  9. You have a beautiful combination of plants still going after the cold has dipped in. I miss growing Camellias and Hydrangeas most of all.

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  10. such beautiful blooms, colourful indeed.

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  11. I love camellias but only grow them in pots so I can over winter in the greenhouse. Not sure they would survive in the ground which is daft because my mum had one in a garden much further North and it was fine! Must be Braver!

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  12. It's wonderful that you can grow brugmansias in the ground! They are root hardy here but our springs are typically so cold that it takes them forever to start putting up growth which is usually eaten by slugs, that they aren't able to attain blooming size by fall so they get stored inside. You have a lot of blooms that are soldiering on in spite of the frost!

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  13. I have never seen the White Shrimp before. It looks quite interesting!

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  14. Love the shot of the Brugmansia; beautiful composition and lovely bloom.

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  15. How uncanny that the frost has arrived on the same date for the second consecutive year. We are still waiting for the first one to arrive in north west England. Your brugmansia is simply stunning Jean. With camellias like sasanqua to look forward to it seems that winter in your garden should be full of beautiful blooms too.

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  16. Your white camellias are gorgeous. We are expecting a very hard freeze tomorrow night. I hope it does not reach as far south as you to spoil your camellias. Are your crepe myrtles still showing such bright colors? My own crepe myrtles have also had lovely fall color this year.

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  17. Oh you still have a lot showing off even after the frost. In our case while you're approaching winter, we are also approaching the coldest temps of our year which might only be the same as your summer. Our long nights produce lovely flowers to show off!

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  18. I do love those camellias!

    You should see us now....we are under a light blanket of 3 inches of snow.

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  19. What gorgeous brugmansias, it must be awful to see them ruined by frost. I love your camellias too. Doesn't the frost turn the white flowers brown?

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  20. Love that camellia - I'm afraid mine will never reach that size. Sympathies on the arrival of the chill. Still, if there were no contrasts, there would be no joy.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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