Monday, April 27, 2015

Bug Hotels Under Construction

Little garden projects are harder to get started than large, sometimes.

Dead stems of Brugmansia and other killed-to-the-ground plants were saved over the winter and cut to lenghts to just fill the holes in concrete blocks used as supports for summer pot benches.

The dark brick pieces in front filled the holes after I saw bricks in the holes of concrete blocks on a feature from the Baltimore Sun on the garden of artist Sherrill Cooper. Bricks made blocks look more 'finished' but bug hotels serve a purpose.


One hotel room has plant stems the other has soft found wood pieces. I think putting thin stems in the diamond shaped hole in the center might be a good touch.

Brug stems have pithy centers that shrink away leaving a cavity.

A different view of the opposite side with found wood. I put pieces of brick behind them to keep them wedged in place without falling back into the space.


There will never be a time when there are not pieces of something awaiting its best usefulness.

Once that first block was done, I went on a short yard tour. I saw a Scarlet Tanager; heard a woodpecker, first pecking on a hollow limb and then making that pock, pock, pock call.

Seedlings are coming up: Tithonia, Melampodium and Madagascar Periwinkle are appearing. None of these require effort on my part except to pull weeds.

10 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tip about using old Brug stems. I didn't realize they would turn hollow. I'd love to make a bug hotel too, but you're right, it's hard to get started. I still have a Bromeliad tree to make.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Where Brugs are brought in for the winter and kept under glass, do you cut them back in spring, Alison? Mine are frost-killed and they do turn hollow.

      I had two new stems that wilted during recent rains. Ground was damp enough, so I figured it was a disease and cut them to the ground. No signs of insect activity or anything and no more stems have wilted.

      Delete
  2. I've been reading a lot about these little pollinator hotels. I bought one but would like to make more. Yours look really nice. Let us know if you get boarders.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm looking forward to boarders. I wondered if all I get will be spiders?

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Blocks support boards for pots out of necessity. I decided the holes may as well serve a purpose too and all those hollow stems as well. Tithonia stems are hollow, too.

      Delete
  4. Very clever! I like how it looks too. I wish you had some of my stalks from Kiss-me-over-the-Garden-Gate. It gets over 5 feet tall and looks very like bamboo. I save some for use as stakes and temporary teepee trellises. I have a couple of clematis that are not yet staked up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Saving stalks for future use is a great garden recycle project. I've never seen Kiss-me-Over stems, another plant to think about using somewhere.

      Delete
  5. Love them...I use cup plant stems, they're hollow and I have more each year!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Genius to use the cinder blocks that are already in use. I have several that support things in my own garden and will go out looking for hollow stems and wood to fill them with. One of the many benefits of not throwing much out is having lots of stems to choose from!

    ReplyDelete

I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



Google+ Followers