Thursday, April 2, 2015

Tedium or Te Deum?

Are emerging weeds and grass a blessing in your garden or an onerous chore?

Every place I have to pull weeds, there are surprises.
In the bed above, there are chickweed, wild geranium, Florida Betony and who knows what else. As I pull them, that volunteer Laura Bush Petunia shines in the sunlight with Rose Campion soon to put on magenta blossoms behind. Brugmansia foliage is rapidly gaining; maybe for late May bloom. There's Ratibida and there are blossoms on some Graptopetalum along the edges.



I give thanks for the strength to pull weeds, the agility to reach them and rich ground in which they grow. As I'm pulling weeds I am finding new growth on old perennials and sweet little seedlings I wasn't expecting.


As the last petals float down from Dogwood trees like snowflakes, the season is extended by white "English Dogwood" as Mama called it. It's really Philadelphus.
Mine is P. Inodorus with no fragrance.

 I pruned 3 Loropetalum in the background this morning. Birds and squirrels planted oaks and other trees underneath. I can't deal with trees growing out of shrubbery, so I prune up the limbs so He-Who can mow underneath.

Philadelphus inodorous



Looking in the other direction. Behind Phildelphus are some Hydrangeas. I'm waiting to see how many new leaves decide to emerge before I start cutting off dead stems.




















Saying good-bye to the latest blooming Camellia, Blood of China as Crape Myrtle trees put on Spring Green leaves.

Spring is a joyous time.

7 comments:

  1. I do that too with my Hydrangeas. It is good to be agile and strong enough to get down on your knees and pull weeds.

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    1. Mophead Hydrangeas are cold-bitten this spring but most made it through. On the other hand, Oakleaf Hydrangeas are trying to take over their neighbors and little suckers are all over the place. I wish I knew somebody who needed lots and lots of them that I wouldn't have to dig and pot to get rid of them.

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  2. I usually consider rose campion a weed here, and end up pulling a lot out.
    -Ray

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    Replies
    1. Rose campion seeds about, yes. Mostly it comes up in paths and the mower gets it. I like the blue-grey leaves and the little dark blossoms, so I let all in the beds stay.

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  3. Beautiful! I have mock orange with no scent too. I really do want to add the fragrant one.

    Like you I am glad to be able to bend down (carefully so I don't pitch forward) and weed. There are days I wish I had a gardener when I get far behind.

    I found a rose campion seedling too. I haven't seen a sign of Laura Bush or my other petunias, but I am hoping.
    We are dropping to 30° tonight......not good.

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    Replies
    1. I don't wish for a gardener -- I wish for somebody to do everything else while I garden: a laundress, a housekeeper, a cook, a personal shopper, a valet to lay out my clothes -- what's the female version of a valet?

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  4. Definitely Te Deum! Even though there are many weeds to pull, I'm grateful for all of the green and the surprises of what's growing beneath, sometimes things that were planted and forgotten are found. We'll still have camellias for a few weeks as some of the later ones are just starting. Happy Easter!

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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