Thursday, May 14, 2015

Bloom Day in the Hot and Humid Coastal South

We hardly had Spring before temperatures soared.

Oakleaf Hydrangeas and White Crape Myrtle

Gardenias started early.

LA Lily Hybrids

  
At left is an LA hybrid complimented with self-planted Harebells. 
Right is Blackout, an Asiatic Lily



 



       Daylilies too numerous to show them all, the two above are representative, Siloam Ury Winniford and Superlative or maybe Kent's Favorite II.


Succulents and Bromeliads moved outside for the summer. I'm showing Burro Tail Sedum because the one on the right has blooms, down at the bottom.

In the background above is my fruit yard, with laden blueberry bushes expected to be ripe next month. The little mess in front of one of the bushes is an Herb Circle with an Okra bed extending to the right of it. If you don't live in the south, you can't imagine how significant it is to have two rows of Okra. We were blessed to get an inch of rain just after I planted it.

Echinacea, Salvia farinacea Victoria, California poppies and Salmon Sheen Daylilies are in this bed. Carefree Delight roses have about finished up a flush of bloom and Vitex is budded. 

Belinda's Dream Rose with Oakleaf Hydrangeas behind.

This Kniphofia bloom fell over from its own weight.

There are so many things to point out: Lantana is blooming in yellow, 
lavender and white.  New broods of Butterflies are hatching and they quickly find nectar sources like Silene. Tithonia seedlings will welcome butterflies soon.


So many other things I had to show you but time and space are precious on Bloom Day. I wanted to show you Mexican Hats and Larkspur and Verbena bonariensis and Gerbera Daisies and Gladioli and Hydrangeas but you must move along to the next Garden.  Thank  you for coming this way. 

... and oh, Stokesia, a native. 

Bloom Day, hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens, never ceases to show the most glorious of Gardens around the World.

  




18 comments:

  1. Love all your lilies and day lilies. They are the stalwarts of the May garden here although the rain is holding many of them back this year. It looks as though you can grow a little of everything in your sandy soils.

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    1. The things I cannot grow are mostly those highly susceptible to root-knot nematodes. Nematodes are the reason I turned to growing tomatoes in containers.

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  2. You've got a lot going on, despite your soaring temperatures. My favorite shot is the one at the top of the post with the oakleaf hydrangeas and crape myrtle - they create a cool and peaceful scene. After getting an early start on summer ourselves with heatwaves in March and again this month, our temperatures have dipped to winter levels (our version of winter, that is) and we've got rain too! It'll be interesting to see if this unseasonal rollercoaster ride continues.

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    1. Maybe I should put a little bench behind the crape Myrtle. I am always waiting for that 'cold day in July' that rarely happens.

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  3. Wonderful!
    I especially like the Rose and the Burro Tails.
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Me, too, Lea, me, too. I waited a long time to find a rose that performs like Belinda's Dream and to have long tails on my sedum.

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  4. The heat and humidity just hit here. Summer is definitely rolling in. I love your colorful perennial bed, but you may keep your okra! I may be a Southerner and my parents tried to get me to like it, but all I can say is YUCK.

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    Replies
    1. My father in law used to entertain the children by slurping a small pod of boiled okra into his mouth. Then he would say, "Elsie Grey (his sister) always said the thing about okra is, when you get up, it's in your chair," which little boys found falling-over funny.

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  5. Wow...your Crape Myrtle are in full bloom and mine haven't even gotten leaves yet! Your perennial bed is also so wonderful!

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    Replies
    1. Only white Crape Myrtle blooms early. The colors wait until well into June to show.

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  6. The plant I like the best if the gorgeous blooms that you have shown is the burros tail. I have always admired this plant but have never tried to grow it. I have so little sun and then to have another plant I have to bring inside m dark house for the winter, well, I just haven't tried it. It isn't even sold around here. That is another good reason. :) Happy GBBD.

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  7. I will forever love your burros ail. Happy vbloom day

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  8. Your garden is a bit ahead of ours but that's what happens in heat and humidity. One becomes acclimated I'm sure but I do love our comparatively cool dry summers. May is a grand time in the garden and you've got lots of beauties blooming right now!

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  9. Gotta love the Gardenia! And those succulents in the pots--wow! Everything looks so lush and healthy! Happy GBBD!

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  10. Your garden looks wonderful and that kniphofia bloom really pops.

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  11. You hit a variety today. I planted stokesia from seed obtained at the February seed swap. Transplanted it last week, and hope it will bloom this year so I can see what color(s) I have. It is in a very sunny dry spot.
    Ray

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  12. Fabulous selection. I really enjoyed a look at those lovely Daylilies and that patch of Echinacea, Salvias, Poppies and Daylilies. Simply gorgeous.

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  13. Wow you have a lot going on there, everything healthy and beautiful. We also have those buro tail sedum here in our very hot tropical climate. I didn't know that name before, and didn't know also that it also blooms. I haven't seen blooms here. Maybe because it needs a little cold to flower. I hope you post them again upon opening. Thanks.

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I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



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