Friday, July 17, 2015

If You Came to Visit my Gardens

If you were coming from Florida, you would turn into the driveway on the south side.



If you missed that turn or were coming from the North, take the drive just north of the Crape Myrtles.

This front corner of the Upper Garden is to the left of the north driveway. There were many butterflies here when I first came out. When I came back half an hour later, they had moved on to other nectar.

Okay, made that turn. The house is in sight, straight ahead.

Your passenger looking out the car window may see a view of the Front Garden, to the right.


You might look between the trees on the left nearer the house to glimpse this view of the Upper Garden, but you'd best watch where you are going because the driveway curves right around the front of the house and then left.

Look back to see the bifurcation of the driveway, similar to the way Angel Trumpet stems form a Y before they form bloom buds. Notice Camellias are wearing pantaloons while I decide whether they will revert to foliage all the way down or be pruned into trees with bare trunks again.

I digress. If you didn't pull up to the carport to park, you make the circle on around to the back. It took me years to figure out exactly how that part of the driveway should go. It turned out perfect for the front of the Equipment barn when it was built.

Mule barn and greenhouse.

Greenhouse, Mule Barn, Farm Equipment barn and tractor Shed. Corner of a tool shed at right belongs to a vintage structure almost as old as our house that in its day was Fruit Room, Laundry and Smoke House where home canned goods, lard and syrup were stored, washing was done, and hams and link sausage were smoked. In my dreams it will become a Garden Retreat.

Pavement loops back through the carport, a notion of MIL who never wanted to have to back out. Just drive onto the grass and keep going on around.

A panoramic view distorts the angles just a bit, but its all there. Thin grass at bottom right is from traffic.

This is a field road but it is grassy because the farm vehicles mostly go to the right behind the plantings at right. We've made full circle if we continue to follow the field road around the curve to its outlet onto the highway. Butterflies and flowers at right obscure your view of the Fruit Yard and my Okra Patch.


We could park in the shade here and get out and look at the Upper Garden, a subject for another post. Blueberries are gone and scuppernong grapes and pears are not yet ripe, but we could go to the back yard and find ripe figs. My vote would be to go in the house where it's cool and have iced tea.

7 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tour! Your garden is so big, I really have never had a concrete idea of how it's laid out. Some sweet tea in the cool house sounds good!

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a huge compound! Mower man has his hands full. It is beautiful and to me represents what a place in the country should be. Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow, what a delightful little drive tour through your lovely property. Very nicely taken care of.

    Have a nice weekend Jean ~ FlowerLady

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for the tour, Jean; I really enjoyed it! I live on a farm, too, and it's so nice to see how you have created your different garden areas. I'm always a bit stumped by design ideas I find, because I don't have the traditional square plot of backyard like most people either. I'd love to see the Upper Garden, but it's hot here, too, and that iced tea sounds like the best idea!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Rose and All, I am getting pics together of the Upper Garden despite dead batteries and little camera discs that do not cooperate. It is at its best about the end of March when Azaleas and Dogwoods steal the show. It's green and somewhat cool in July but it is cooler in the house.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I knew your property was probably big but wow! I loved the tour. Properties like yours don't exist in Los Angeles anymore (unless you count a few locations owned by mega-rich celebrities). When I was a kid growing up in one of the county's inland valleys, there were ranches and orange orchards with that kind of land but, sadly, they're mostly gone, replaced by concrete.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What fun. I would love to visit your garden. It looks very inviting with the island of plants and grass pathways. Lucky you having a nice greenhouse. I would love to have one. The heating would make it impossible to keep for me.

    ReplyDelete

I look forward to comments and questions and lively discussion of gardening and related ideas.



Google+ Followers